Russo-Ukrainian War: Blinken and Austin in kyiv for Zelenskiy talks, adviser says – live | Ukraine

US officials meet with Zelenskiy in kyiv

US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Secretary of State Antony Blinken are currently in talks with Volodymyr Zelensky, an adviser told local Ukrainian media. Zelensky is expected to use the meeting to call for more US military aid.

President @ZelenskyyUa he currently has a meeting in kyiv with US Secretary of State Blinken and Pentagon chief Austin, according to @arestovych. The topic of the talks should have been the supply of weapons to Ukraine.

– SUSPILNE NEWS @ (@suspilne_news) April 24, 2022

Igor Zhovkva, one of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s top diplomatic advisers, criticized United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ upcoming meeting with Vladimir Putin and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavror, saying Guterres “really “He does not have the authority to speak on behalf of Ukraine.

“This is not a good idea to travel to Moscow. We do not understand his intention to travel to Moscow to speak with President Putin,” Zhovkva said on NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday.

Zhovkva said that while “any peace talk is good if it ends with a result,” “I really doubt that those peace talks organized by the UN secretary-general will end with any result.”

Guterres will meet with Putin and Lavrov on Tuesday. He will then meet with Zelensky and Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba on Thursday.

Guterres announced the meeting on Friday. tweeting “We need urgent action to save lives, end human suffering and bring peace to Ukraine.”

VIDEO: Igor Zhovkva, President Zelenskyy’s top diplomatic adviser, joins #MTP from Kyiv.

Mariupol “is almost wiped out. People live without… food, water, electricity… We need the attention of the international community.”#MTP #IfitsSunday pic.twitter.com/uAN74dLXPA

— Meet the press (@MeetThePress) April 24, 2022

US officials meet with Zelenskiy in kyiv

US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Secretary of State Antony Blinken are currently in talks with Volodymyr Zelensky, an adviser told local Ukrainian media. Zelensky is expected to use the meeting to call for more US military aid.

President @ZelenskyyUa he currently has a meeting in kyiv with US Secretary of State Blinken and Pentagon chief Austin, according to @arestovych. The topic of the talks should have been the supply of weapons to Ukraine.

– SUSPILNE NEWS @ (@suspilne_news) April 24, 2022

Beyond the destruction taking place in Ukraine due to Russia’s invasion, the conflict could have a major impact on climate change if the Russian wildfires are not stopped.

Experts have raised concerns that Russia will allow wildfires, which are a major source of carbon emissions, to grow as it dedicates its military aircraft to invasion rather than firefighting.

“Either there will be more fires…or these planes and personnel will be pulled from the Western Front and taken to Siberia,” Jessica McCarty, a climate researcher at Miami University in Ohio, told Axios.

In a tweet, Lesia Volodymyrivna, Ukraine’s people’s deputy, said: “The question is what will Putin choose: fewer fires in Russia or fewer attacks in Ukraine?”

A bit of visual contrast: Ukrainian soldiers holding large Easter cakes.

A new Wall Street Journal report reveals that US officials have been slow to impose sanctions against Alina Kabaeva, a former Russian Olympic gymnast believed to be the mistress of Vladimir Putin. Last month, the US targeted Putin’s daughters Maria Vorontsova and Katerina Tikhonova, along with his ex-wife Lyudmila Shkrebneva but Kabaeva, and at least three of her children believed to be from Putin, they were left out. Here’s more from the Journal:

Kabaeva, a former Olympic champion rhythmic gymnast known in the sport for her extreme flexibility and an international doping scandal, is suspected of playing a role in hiding Putin’s personal wealth abroad, U.S. officials said, and remains a potential target. sanctions.

The belief among US officials discussing the move is that sanctioning Kabaeva would be seen as such a personal blow to Putin that it could further heighten tensions between Russia and the US. Putin, 69, has never acknowledged a relationship. with Ms. Kabaeva, a 39-year-old former Russian Vogue cover model.

The US Treasury Department, which US officials say prepared the sanctions package against Ms Kabaeva, now on hold, declined to comment. US officials said action against Ms. Kabaeva is not out of the question.

The Kremlin has long denied any relationship between Putin and Kabaeva. Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, did not respond to requests for comment. Kabaeva, who has denied having a relationship with Putin, could not be reached for comment.

French polling agencies project that voters have chosen French President Emmanuel Macron for a second term, beating far-right candidate Marine Le Pen.

The strong voter base that Le Pen had built during the election raised concerns about what the French election might mean for the future of the Russian invasion. Earlier this month, Le Pen said that she, if elected, would propose closer ties between NATO and Russia once the war is over, and remove France from the alliance’s military command.

In the run-up to the election, Macron had described Le Pen as a friend of Russia, saying she was “complacent” and “financially dependent” on the Kremlin, charges she denied.

Some Twitter users celebrate the unofficial victory as a good sign for Ukraine.

Congratulations to Macron. And with a wide margin. This is a mandate for France to fully support Ukraine. No more talks with Putin. No more “brotherly love” https://t.co/DIZlrj8pwF

– Pablo Massaro (@apmassaro3) April 24, 2022

‘Everything was dark’: Residents rescued after Russian airstrike on Odessa homes – video

At least eight people, including a baby, have been killed in a Russian missile attack on the southern Ukrainian port city of Odessa.

Resident Ekateryna described running 17 floors with her family, including her parents and young daughter, after hearing the explosion and smoke blacking out the windows of her home.

This is Lauren Aratani taking over from Sam Jones.

Bulgarian journalist Christo Grozev noted on a flight tracking website that a Ukrainian Antonov plane had just landed in the Bulgarian capital.

On Twitter, Grozev notes that Bulgaria has been “secretly supplying ammunition to Ukraine through a ‘third country'” as a way to “prevent the disintegration” of the coalition government in the country, which includes the pro-Russian socialist party.

On Thursday, Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba called on Bulgaria, which is a member of NATO and the EU, for military aid.

“The best way to bring peace closer today is to support Ukraine,” Kuleba told the Bulgarian parliament.

Believers celebrate Easter in a church in Mariupol
A priest sprinkles holy water on believers on Easter day at the Svyato-Troitsky church, amid the conflict between Ukraine and Russia, in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 24, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko
Photograph: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters

lorenzo tondo

Dozens of civilians who died during the Russian occupation of the Ukrainian city of Bucha were killed by tiny metal arrows from projectiles of a kind fired by Russian artillery.coroners have said.

Pathologists and forensic doctors conducting autopsies on bodies found in mass graves in the region north of kyiv, where Russian occupation forces have been accused of atrocities, said they had found small metal darts, called fléchettes, embedded in the head and chest of people.

Independent weapons experts who reviewed images of the metal arrows found on the bodies, seen by The Guardian, confirmed that they were fléchettes, an anti-personnel weapon widely used during the First World War.

These small metal darts are contained in tanks or shells of field weapons. Each shell can contain up to 8,000 fléchettes. Once fired, the projectiles explode as a timed fuse detonates and explodes above the ground.

The flechettes, typically 3-4 cm long, break free from the shell and disperse in a conical arc about 300 m wide and 100 m long. Upon impact with the victim’s body, the dart can lose stiffness and become a hook, while the rear part of the arrow, made up of four fins, often breaks off, causing a second wound.

A small metal dart, called a fléchette, embedded in the body of a murdered man in Bucha, where Russian occupiers have been accused of atrocities against residents.  Courtesy of the kyiv forensic department.
A small metal dart, called a fléchette, embedded in the body of a murdered man in Bucha, where Russian occupiers have been accused of atrocities against residents. Courtesy of the kyiv forensic department. Photography: Alessio Mamo

A Russian-speaking expatriate celebrating Easter lights a candle at the Orthodox Christian Church in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Sunday, April 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Isabel Debre)
A Russian-speaking expatriate celebrating Easter lights a candle at the Orthodox Christian Church in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Sunday, April 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Isabel Debre) Photograph: Isabel Debre / AP

AP has this interesting report from the United Arab Emirates, where Russians and Ukrainians celebrate Orthodox Easter at the only Russian Orthodox church on the Arabian Peninsula:

The church’s golden Byzantine crosses rise unexpectedly from the dusty streets of Sharjah, a conservative Muslim emirate just south of skyscraper-studded Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.

Although the two nationalities, united in language and history, often celebrate Easter in harmony in this strange corner of the world where they have forged new lives as expats, this year there was an unspoken tension even as children in floral dresses played on the stone steps. . and priests blessed overflowing baskets of bread under the scorching sun.

“I have no problem with Russians as people,” said Sergei, a Ukrainian businessman from kyiv and a five-year Dubai resident, who like all those interviewed declined to give his last name for privacy reasons. “But war changes people. The children are dying. The Russians now hate my country.”

Some Russians interviewed said they did not support the war and felt sick or guilty about it. But to avoid any confrontation in the pews, they limited themselves to chatting with Ukrainians about the festivities and the hot weather, they said.

“We are all the same, we all come from Russia or Ukraine to seek a better life here,” said Kata, who moved from Moscow to Dubai for a marketing job just before the war. “It’s so rare between us right now. We try as much as possible not to talk about the war. It’s too painful, too difficult.”

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